Category: Writing

I don’t think this category needs a lot of explanation.
I am a writer, and I like to write about writing. Posts can be about something I noticed, or learned.
If you don’t write yourself, this category might not be for you, but who doesn’t write at least ocassionally in their work? Not all of my blog posts apply to e-mails or reports, but some definitely do.
Also, knowing more about writing can help you better appreciate novels, or — be warned — ruin them for you.

May 1, 2015 / Writing

WritingWide

When I started writing a novel for the first time, I didn’t really know what I was doing. I made a list of cool events that led to what I considered a cool ending, then started writing. That was back in the days of the dial-up modem, when you couldn’t look up a thousand articles about writing on your smartphone.  I had little knowledge about how to structure a story. I learned a lot since then, and actually finished a novel-sized story.

I experimented a lot with different ways to set up a story structure. There are a lot of ways to do that. You can follow along the lines of the monomyth, use the five-act structure, or any number of other structures. Today I’ll talk about the seven-point structure, which is a more detailed version of the three-act structure.

April 17, 2015 / Writing
April 10, 2015 / Smells

WhiteRoom

Writing a story is like juggling; there are a lot of considerations spinning through the air and you somehow have to keep all of them up. You have to have snappy dialog, but paced well, good description, but not too much, character arcs, a well thought-out plot, and so forth.

To be able to take all these considerations correctly into account, you first need to know what they are, and what can go wrong. You need to know when your writing smells, and what it smells of. The writing smell for today: white room syndrome.

April 3, 2015 / Writing
March 27, 2015 / Smells

Statue

In previous posts I’ve identified writing smells, places in your writing that reek of problems. If you can identify these smells you can improve your writing.
Because my list of smells keeps growing, I’ve decided to start gathering them in a separate page, a writing smell catalogue, which is easier to peruse than a bunch of blog posts.

One of the more famous writing smells, or at least one that’s old enough to have a latin name: deus ex machina. Actually, this latin name is derived from an ancient Greek name, so it’s even older.