Seven-point structure

WritingWide

When I started writing a novel for the first time, I didn’t really know what I was doing. I made a list of cool events that led to what I considered a cool ending, then started writing. That was back in the days of the dial-up modem, when you couldn’t look up a thousand articles about writing on your smartphone.  I had little knowledge about how to structure a story. I learned a lot since then, and actually finished a novel-sized story.

I experimented a lot with different ways to set up a story structure. There are a lot of ways to do that. You can follow along the lines of the monomyth, use the five-act structure, or any number of other structures. Today I’ll talk about the seven-point structure, which is a more detailed version of the three-act structure. Continue reading “Seven-point structure”

The Zombie Apocalypse as a writing tool

Walking Dead Screenshot

I’ve been playing the Walking Dead, season 2, a video game about the zombie apocalypse, as you can see in the screenshot above. It got me thinking, and I’m going to take a look at the zombie apocalypse from a writer’s perspective. Continue reading “The Zombie Apocalypse as a writing tool”

Writing smell: White Room Syndrome

WhiteRoom

Writing a story is like juggling; there are a lot of considerations spinning through the air and you somehow have to keep all of them up. You have to have snappy dialog, but paced well, good description, but not too much, character arcs, a well thought-out plot, and so forth.

To be able to take all these considerations correctly into account, you first need to know what they are, and what can go wrong. You need to know when your writing smells, and what it smells of. The writing smell for today: white room syndrome. Continue reading “Writing smell: White Room Syndrome”

Role-playing for writing

Role-playing

I’ve been playing Dungeons & Dragons and other role-playing games for two decades. As a storyteller, I’ve found that role-playing a character or running a session has a lot in common with running a string of writing exercises, with immediate, sometimes in-your-face, feedback. Continue reading “Role-playing for writing”